| Location: Sydney (AUS) | Sunrise: 06:20 | Sunset: 17:30 | GMT +10 |
 | Home  | Moon  | Monitor  | News  | About Me  | Site Map  | Guest Book  |   | 
Your browser did not load the style sheet and as a result the web page is not displaying correctly.
  • Cause: You use a low speed connection or the Internet is slow at this time. Solution: Hit the Refresh Button of the browser.
  • Cause: Your browser is not complying with the cascading style sheet used. Solution: Update your browser. We recommend Internet Explorer (IE) or FireFox.


English language
CALIN
Limba Romana
CALIN
Autumn come, the dead leaves flying,
A cricket somewhere softy crying,
A sad breeze whispering at your window,
The pane with trembling fingers prying,
While you're awaiting gentle sleep
Alone before your fireplace lying.
What made you start and raise your head.
Was is a foot the stairway trying?
Aye, 'tis your lover come at last,
Around your waist his strong arm plying.
Before your face he holds a mirror,
Wherein your loveliness espying,
You gaze upon its image long
And linger, dreaming, smiling, sighing.

I

Over the hill the moon ascends her fiery crown of crimson deep,
Staining the ancient forest red, and the lonely castle keep,
And staining red the tumbling waves that from a murmuring fountain well,
While down the sweeping valley rolls the solemn music of a bell.
Above the river's rocky course rises the castle grim and tall
While, clinging fast against its face, a knight is scaling high the wall;
Clambering up on hands and knees, and holding tight to crack and edge,
Until the rusty bars he breaks that issue from a window ledge.
Silently he passes through, and soft, on tiptoe, does he creep
Into a secret chamber where the wall is hung with shadow deep
And where the starry sky between the bars and tangled creepers gleams
And timidly and unassured the broken moonlight softly streams;
Where strikes the moon the walls and floor are white as though they had been chalked,
But darkness lies where shadows fall, as black as though with charcoal marked.
Down from the ceiling to the floor has an enchanted spider spun
A wonder web, more light and fair than e'er by human weaver done.
It trembles in the silver light as though its veil would surely tear
Beneath the weight of misty gems that shine upon its filet there.
Beyond the web, in magic sleep, the sovereign's lovely daughter lies,
Drenched in the moon's unearthly light, before the knight's enraptured eyes.
Beneath the sheet her form he sees, her sleeping body young and fair,
For the silken coverings hide it but little from his stare,
And here and there her sleeping gown parted a little leaves to show
The secret lovely nakedness of girlish limbs as white as snow.
Upon her pillow's smooth incline her heavy golden hair is laid,
While on her temples gently throb her pulses in a violet shade:
Drawn as though in one straight line, in noble and bewitching grace
Beneath the curtain of lids, her eyes in slumber seem to beat?
While one smooth rounded shapely arm lies nakedly upon the sheet.
Her full and gently moving breast in maiden ripeness tender shows
And through her lips, a bit apart, her burning breath in silence flows.
Her delicate and lovely mouth moves sweetly in a wistful smile,
While over her and round her head a mound of fragrant petals pile.
But now the knight draws near her bed and stretching out his hand he tears
The spider's sparkling wonder web and spills the precious gems it bears.
Upon her beauty's nakedness he feeds his hungry heart's desire
And scarcely can his breast contain the burning ardour of its fire;
Till clasping her to him at last in one long, clinging sweet caress,
His scarlet mouth is set on hers, and on her lips his hot lips press.
Then taking from her hand a ring, glittering with jewels dear,
Turns, and through the moonlit casement goes our dauntless cavalier.

II

When morning comes, and the wondering maid finds that the web is broken through
And in her mirror sees her lips by thirsty kisses bruised and blue,
Sadly she smiles and softly says, while gazing on her image white;
"O dauntless, dark curled fairy prince, come back again to me tonight".

III

Each one of us has private notions about sweet maidens and their ways,
But no man in his sense will doubt that they Love best themselves to praise.
Just as Narcissus saw his face framed in the water's silver glass
And finding he was fair, at once the lover and the loved one was.
If we could only see the maid when she essays her winning airs,
When all alone with with round eyes she at her mirrored image stares,
See the provoking, pouting lips moving to call herself by name,
And she herself more lovable than all the world does soft acclaim;
He that is wise in maidens' ways would read her secret at a glace,
And know the lovely lass has grown aware of her own elegance.
Idol thou, o thief of wits, great blue eyes and golden hair,
The worship of your maiden heart has chosen too an idol fair !
What does she whisper secretly, what words of love does she bestow
Upon the figure mirrored there, which she regards from top to toe?
"A beauteous dream I had indeed, a fairy prince who came by night.
I almost squeezed the life from him, my arm about him clasped so tight.
And thus it is, with outstretched arms, my gaze my image does caress
When I before my mirror stand alone in all my nakedness,
And like a cloak against my sides my heavy hanging golden hair,
When I regard myself and smile, and fain would kiss my shoulder bare,
Until the blood mounts to my face for very shame of my desires,
O fairy prince why don't you come to quench the flame my being fires,
If in my body I rejoice, if I find pleasure in my eyes,
It is because I see 'tis there the wonders of his passion rise;
The love I love I lavish on myself is only of his love a part.
Mouth, learn wisdom's quick restraint, lest you betray my loving heart
Even to him who steals by night to the couch on which his loved one lies,
Be passionate as a woman is, but as an artful child be wise".

IV

So every night the fairy prince does to her bedside softly creep
And with a sweet enchanted kiss awake her gently from her sleep.
And when he to the window goes to flee before the dawn away,
She will retain him with her eyes and humbly pleading she will say:
"O stay, o go not with the dawn, think of the fiery vows you made,
Do not depart, may black-locked prince, o luckless and ill-fated shade.
You will not find in wandering through all the endless ways of space
A soul to love you as I do, you will not find a fairer face.
Sweet is the shadow of your eyes with depth of sadness unsurpassed,
May no one on your, luckless course the evil eye upon you cast".
Then to her bed he comes again, about her waist her his strong arms steal,
She whispers words of tender love, whispers which her fiery kisses seal.
He murmurs "Whisper on, dear love, and let thy eyes' soft mystery
Speak on in meaningless sweet words, that full of meaning are to me.
Life's golden moment, swift as light, as transient as the rising smoke,
I dream entire when with my hands thy mouth and shapely arm I stroke,
When on my breast you lean your head feeling my heart's enamoured beat
And I in passion press my lips upon your rounded shoulder sweet;
And when our thirsty lips unite, I drink thy breath into my soul,
Our hearts grown heavy in our breasts, that each the other's pain console.
When, lost in ecstasy of love, you hold your burning cheek to mine,
And when your long, soft golden hair about my neck you gently twine,
And when at last you close your eyes and generously your kisses give,
Then am I happiest of men, the height of joy superlative...
And you... but no, I have no words, my tongue is tied and cannot move,
I would, and yet I cannot speak... I cannot tell you how I love".
Thus would they talk and so much say, such happiness was in them springing,
Yet often was their discourse checked, their lips so often sweetly clinging,
Thus clasped in close embrace they lay, drinking of lover's joy their fill.
Till silent grew their lips at last, although their eyes were speaking still
And bashfully she covered up her face, with soft confusion red,
And hid her tearful eyes within her shining hair of golden thread.

V

Now white and waxen is your face that ruddy like an apple shone,
And your smooth and lovely cheeks have shrunken grown and thin and wan.
Now from your eyes your silken tresses wipe many a sad despairing tear
That from your broken heart is sent. Disenchanted you appear,
Standing thus before your window, with no word upon your lips.
Now you raise your long wet lashes, and out of the room your sad soul slips,
Soaring up the limpid heavens where the tireless lark does fly.
You would call for him to take you with him up the shining sky.
The bird flies on quite unawares while you with tearful eyes remain,
Your luckless lips devoid of speech, trembling as though in pain.
O do not quench in useless weeping the light that gleams from your blue eyes;
Do not forget that in their tears the secret of their beauty lies.
Thus, silver drops, from heaven's space, the falling stars descend like rain,
But ere they cross the deep blue vault they are each one re-caught again,
For should they weep their tears away the heavens would be blind and bare.
Fruitless is it that you essay to span the lofty dome of air.
The night of moonshine and of stars, of streams like mirrors shining bright
Cannot be likened anyway unto the tomb's dark endless night.
It does but lend your beauty charm if now and then a tear be shed,
But if you drain the fountains dry, how shall they be replenished?
Let the colour gain your cheeks, as proud and lovely as a rose,
Your youthful cheeks that now are pale as violet shaded mountain snows.
Your eyes give back their violet night that all eternity endears,
But which so swiftly destroyed beneath the track of bitter tears.
Who is there who is mad enough to burn on coals an emerald rare,
That all its lovely lustrous shine be lost and squandered in the air?
You veil your eyes' dark brilliancy to waste your beauty unbeguiled,
And knows the world not what it lacks. O weep no more, you hapless child.

VI

O king, with long and tangled beard, like twisted hanks of cotton wool,
There is no wisdom in your brains: with bran and dust your skull is full.
Are you well pleased to be alone, you sorry joker, weak and old,
Poor are you now in very truth, that once had riches beyond words.
Your daughter you have driven out, to some far corner of the earth,
That in a mean and lonely hut to a young prince she should give birth.
In vain you send your messengers to search for her the whole world round,
For not a single one of them can guess the place she may be found.

VII

Grey are the autumn evenings now; the water of the lake is grey,
A thousand ripples cross its face to hide among the reeds away;
While through the forest gently sighs a wind that takes the withered leaves 
And shakes them softly to the ground, a passing wind that sadly heaves
The boughs. Till now the forest branches stripped of all their leaves are bare
And does the lonely moon unchecked her beams of silver squander there.
In melancholy harmonies the brook is murmuring its distress
The wailing breeze snaps off a twig and nature dons her saddest dress.
But who is this that wanders down the steep and winding forest track,
This youth who o'er the valley throws his eagle eyes of fiery black?
O dark-haired prince, seven years have passed since when you climbed the castle wall,
Have you forgot the lovely maid that loved you well and gave you all?
Now in the open field he sees a little, bright, bare footed child
Endeavouring to drive along a quacking brood of ducklings wild.
"Good day to you, my lad", he cries... "Good day brave stranger," says the lad.
"Tell me what's your name young man". "Calin, the name my father had.
Whenever I my mother ask whose boy I am she says the same:
A fairy prince your father is, and Calin also is his name".
And as he listens only he knows how his heart leaps up with joy
To see this child that drives the ducks and recognize him as his boy
Hi enters now the narrow hut where, at a wooden bench's end,
A rush light in an earthen pot its feeble yellow light does serend.
Two large round cakes he finds are set to bake upon the hearth's rude stone;
One shoe is flung beneath a beam and one behind the door is thrown.
An old and dented coffee-mill somewhere in a corner lies,
While near the fire a sleek tomcat purrs and cleans its ears and eye
Beneath the icon of a saint, hanging be smoked upon the wall,
A little candela is hung, as poppy seed its flame is small.
Below the icon on a shelf are thyme and mint arranged in heaps,
From which throughout the darkened hut a hot and peppery fragrance seeps.
Upon the dingy plaster walls and on the stone besmeared with clay
The infant, with a charcoal stick, has drawn, to wile the time away,
Pigs with corkscrew curling tails and little trotters drawn like twigs,
The kind that really most become all self-respecting piggie-wigs.
Across the tiny window frame a bladder stretched in place of glass,
Through which but faint and gloomy rays into the cottage dimly pass.
Upon a bed of simple boards, motionless the princess lies,
Her face towards the window turned, but closed in sleep her lovely eyes.
He sits beside her on the bed, he lays his hand upon her brow,
And sadly he caresses her, he sighs and fondles her, and now,
Bending down his lips to her, quietly her name he calls,
Till, opening her drowsy eyes o'er which a fringe of lashes falls,
Terrified she starts and stares, believing it is all a dream;
Fain would she smile but does not dare, she is afraid yet dares not scream.
He lifts her from her narrow bed and holds his arms around her fast,
His heart so beats within his breast he feels that it must burst at last.
She stares at him and still she stares, but not a single world is said
Then laughs with brimming tearful eyes, before this miracle afraid.
Around her finger long and white she twists a mesh of raven hair,
Then falls upon his ready breast to hide from him her blushes there.
He smoothes away the kerchief that wraps and covers up her head,
And tenderly with burning lips does kiss that crown of golden thread.
She raises her face to his, her eyes, in which sparkling tears spring
And fondly their lips unite, and each does to the other cling.

VIII

If through the copper woods you pass, the silver woods shine far away,
There you will hear a thousand throats proclaim the forest's roundelay.
The grass beside the bubbling spring shines like snow in sunlight fair
And blue flowers drenched in moisture rise and tremble in the perfumed air.
It seems the tall and ancient trees have souls beneath their bar concealed,
Souls that oft amid their boughs by singing voices are revealed,
While down the hidden forest glades, beneath the twilight's silver haze,
One sees the rapid brooklets leap along their shining pebbly ways.
In hurrying, gleaming ripples bright, sighing among the flowers they go
And tumbling down the torrent's track murmur and gurgle as they flow,
Swelling in liquid masses clear over the shallow gravel beds,
A swirling, eddying, dancing stream, on which the moon her silver sheds.
Many small blue butterflies, and many a swarm of golden bees
Busy at visiting the honey flowers pass in among the trees,
And a host of darting, shining flies of different kinds and hues
Make the summer air vibrate with colours that the eyes confuse.
Beside the sleepy trembling lake, its waters softly glimmering,
Stands a long table over which the torches' flames are shimmering.
Emperors and empresses from North and South and West and East
Are come to meet the lovely bride and celebrate that weddings feast,
Paladins with golden hair and dragons dressed in wondrous mail,
Magicians and astrologers, and the clown Pepele happy and pale.
Above them all the aged king sits in his royal high-backed chair,
Upon his head he wears a crown, has trimmed his beard and combed his hair,
Bolt upright on cushions high he sits, his sceptre in his hand
And is, lest flies should trouble him, by willow bearing pages fanned.
Now out of the forest's black retreat advances Calin, by his side,
Her hand within her bridegroom's hand, his radiant and smiling bride.
As they come near one hears the leaves rustle beneath her rich long dress.
She has her cheeks flushing with pleasure and her eyes sparkling with joy.
Sweeping almost to the ground billows her soft and golden hair,
Falling about her shapely arms and over her white shoulders bare.
Gracefully indeed she moves, carries herself with noble mien,
Upon her brow she wears a star and in her hair blue flowers are seen.
The king bids all the guests to seat themselves, the feast is then begun.
For bridesmaid does he name the moon, for groomsman names the sun.
The guests about the table sit according to their rank and years,
The cobza and the violin play softly to delighted ears.
But what strange music sounds beside? Low as a swarm of bees it hums.
The guests in wonder stare, but none can tell from whence it comes.
Till they descry a cobweb vast hung like a bridge across the glade
O'er which a multitude of beasts rush by in murmuring cascade.
Ants in hundreds carrying sacks of flour and little lumps of yeast
In their strong mouths, to bake puddings and cakes for the wedding feast,
Bees with honey from the comb and pure gold dust upon their thighs,
From which the woodworm, goldsmith fine, will make fantastic jewelleries.
Till lastly comes the wedding train, a cricket bears the usher's rod,
While round him leaps a host of fleas, their tiny feet in iron shod.
In a portentous velvet robe straddles a great potbellied drone,
Who in a drowsy nasal drawl mimics the priestly monotone.
Grasshoppers pull a nutshell coach, the cobweb shakes as it goes by
Within it, curling his moustache, reclines the bridegroom butterfly.
And after him there comes a host of butterflies of every sort
In light hearted cavalcade, playful, gallant, full of sport.
Mosquitoes form the orchestra, here are beetles, there are snails.
The bride, a timid violet moth, shelters behind her trailing veils.
Upon the table spread, the nimble usher cricket takes a spring,
Rises upon his hind legs, bows, and clicks his spurs so that they ring;
Then coughs and buttons up his coat and says, ere the amazement ceased,
"Pardon us, Lords And Ladies, if we have by yours our wedding feast."

Translated by
Corneliu M. Popescu
Toamna frunzele colindă,
Sun-un grier sub o grindă,
Vântul jalnic bate-n geamuri
Cu o mână tremurândă,
Iară tu la gura sobei
Stai ca somnul să te prindă.
Ce tresari din vis deodată?
Tu auzi păsind în tindă --
E iubitul care vine
De mijloc să te cuprindă
Si în fata ta frumoasă
O să tie o oglindă,
Să te vezi pe tine însăti 
Visătoare, surâzândă.

I

Pe un deal răsare luna, ca o vatră de jăratic,
Rumenind stră vechii codri si castelul singuratic
S-ale râurilor ape, ce sclipesc fugind în ropot --
De departe-n văi coboară tânguiosul glas de clopot ;
Pe deasupra de prăpăstii sunt zidiri de cetătuie,
Acătat de pietre sure un vioinic cu greu le suie ;
Asezând genunchiu si mână când pe-un colt când pe alt colt
Au ajuns să rupă gratii ruginite-a unei bolti
Si pe-a degerelor vârfuri în ietacul tăinuit
Intră -- unde zidul negru într-un arc a-ncremenit.
Ci prin flori întretesute, printre gratii luna moale
Sfiicioasă si smerită si-au vărsat razele sale ;
Unde-ajung par văruite zid, podele, ca de cridă,
Pe-unde nu -- părea că umbra cu cărbune-i zugrăvită.
Iar de sus pân-în podele un painjăn prins de vrajă
A tesut subtire pânză străvezie ca o mreajă ;
Tremurând ea licureste si se pare a se rumpe,
Încărcată de o bură, de un colb de pietre scumpe.
După pânza de păinjăn doarme fata de-mpărat ;
Înecată de lumină e întinsă în crivat.
Al ei chip se zugrăveste plin si alb : cu ochiu-l măsuri
Prin usoara-nvinetire a subtirilor mătăsuri ;
Ici sicolo a ei haină s-a desprins din sponci s-arată
Trupul alb în goliciunea-i, curătia eide fată.
Răsfiratul păr de aur peste perini se-mprăstie,
Tâmpla bate linistită ca o umbră viorie,
Si sprâncenele arcate fruntea albă i-o încheie,
Cu o singură trăsură măiestrit le încondeie ;
Sub pleoapele închise globii ochilor se bat,
Bratul ei atârnă lenes peste marginea de pat ;
De a vârstii ei căldură fragii sânului se coc, 
A ei gură-i desclestată de-a suflării sale foc,
Ea zâmbind îsi miscă dulce a ei vuze mici, subtiri ;
Iar pe patu-i si la capu-i presurati-s trandafiri.
Iar voinicul s-apropie si cu mâna sa el rumpe
Pânza cea acoperită de un colb de poetre scumpe ;
A frumsetii haruri goale ce simtirile-i adapă,
Încăperile gândirii mainu pot să le încapă.
El în brate prinde fata, peste fată i se-nclină,
Pune gura lui fierbinte pe-a ei buze ce suspină,
Si inelul scump i-l scoare de pe degetul cel mic --
S-apoi pleacă iar în lume năzdrăvanul cel voinic.

II

Ea a doua zi se miră, cum de firele sunt rupte,
Si-n oglind-ale ei buze vede vinete si supte --
Ea zâmbind si trist se uită, sopoteste blând din gură :
-- "Zburător cu negre plete, vin' la noapte de mă fură".

III

Fiecine cum i-e vrerea, despre fete samă deie-si --
Dar ea seamănă celora îndrăgiti de singuri ei-si.
Si Narcis văzându-si fata în oglinda sa, isvorul,
Singur fuse îndrăgitul, singur el îndrăgitorul.
Si de s-ar putea pe dânsa cineva ca să o prindă,
Când cu ochii mari, sălbateci, se priveste în oglindă,
Subtiindu-si gura mică si chemându-se pe nume
Si fiindu-si sie dragă cum nu-i este nime-n lume,
Atunci el cu o privire nălucirea i-ar discoasă
Cum că ea -- frumoasa fata -- a ghicit că e frumoasă. 
Idol tu ! răpire mintii ! cu ochi mari si părul des,
Pentr-o inimă fecioară mândru idol ti-ai ales !
Ce soprste ea în taină, când priveste cu mirare
Al ei chip gingas si tânăr, de la cap pân' la picioare?
"Vis frumos avut-am noaptea. A venit un zburător
Si strângându-l tare-n brate, era mai ca să-l omor...
Si de-aceea când mă caut în păretele de-oglinzi
Singurică-n cămărută brate albe eu întinz
Si mă-mbrac în părul galben, ca în strai usor tesut,
Si zărind rotundu-mi umăr mai că-mi vine să-l sărut.
Si atunci de sfiiciune mi-iese sângele-n obraz --
Cum nu viine zburătorul, ca la pieptul lui să caz?
Dacă boiul mi-l înmlădiiu, dacă ochii mei îmi plac,
E temeiul că acestea fericit pe el îl fac.
Si mi-s dragă mie însămi, pentru că-i sunt dragă lui --
Gură tu ! învată minte, nu mă spune nimănui,
Nici chiar lui, când vine noaptea lângă patul meu tiptil, 
Doritor ca o femeie, si viclean ca un copil !"

IV

Astfel vine-n toată noaptea zbutător la al ei pat.
Se trezi sin somn deodată de sărutu-i fermecat ;
Si atuncea când spre usă el se-ntoarse ca să fugă,
Ea-l opreste-n loc cu ochii si c-o mult smerită rugă :
- "O rămâi, rămâi la mine, tu cu viers duios de foc,
Zburător cu plete negre, umbră fără de noroc
Si nu crede că în lume, singurel si rătăcit,
Nu-i găsi un suflet tânăr ce de tine-i îndrăgit.
O, tu umbră pieritoare, cu adâncii tristi ochi,
Dulci-s ochii umvrei tale -- nu le fie de diochi !"
El s-asează lângă dânsa si o prinde de mijloc,
Ea sopteste vorbe arse de al buzelor ei foc :
- "O sopteste-mi -- zice dânsul -- tu cu ochi plini d-eres
Dulci cuvinte nentelse, însă pline de-nteles.
Al vietii vis de aur ca un fulger, ca o clipă-i,
Si-l visez, când cu-a mea mână al tău brat rotund îl pipăi, 
Când pui capul tu pe pieptu-mi si bătăile îi numeri,
Când sărut cu-mpătimire ai tăi albi si netezi umeri
Si când sorb al tău răsuflet în suflarea vietii mele
Si când inima ne creste de un dor, de-o dulce jele ;
Când pierdută razimi fruntea de-arzătorul meu obraz,
Părul tău bălai si moale de mi-l legi după grumaz,
Ochii tăi pe jumătate de-i închizi, mi-ntinzi o gură,
Fericit mă simt atuncea cu asupra de măsură.
Tu ! !... nu vezi... nu-ti aflu nume... Limba-n gură mi se leagă
Si nu pot sa-ti spun odată, cât -- ah ! cât îmi esti de dragă !"
Ei soptesc, multe si-ar spune si nu stiu de-unde să-nceapă,
Căci pe rând si-astupă gura, când cu gura se adapă ;
Unu-n bratele altuia, tremurând ei se sărută,
Numai ochiul e vorbaret, iară limba lor e mută, 
Ea-si acopere cu mâna fata rosă de sfială, 
Ochii-n lacrimi si-i ascunde într-un păr ca de peteală.

V

S-au făcut ca ceara albă fata rosă ca un măr
Si atâta de subtire, să o tai cu-n fir de păr.
Si cosita ta bălaie o aduni la ochi plângând,
Inimă făr' de nădejde, suflete bătut de gând.
Toată ziua la fereastră suspinând nu spui nimică,
Ridicând a tale gene, al tău suflet se ridică ;
Urmărind pe ceruri limpezi cum pluteste-o ciocârlie,
Tu ai vra să spui să spui să ducă către dânsul o solie,
Dar ea zboară... tu cu ochiul plutitor si-ntunecos
Stai cu buze disclestate de un tremur dureros.
Nu-ti mai scurge ochii tineri, dulcii cerului fiastri,
Nu uita că-n lacrimi este taina ochilor albastri.
Stele rare din tărie cad ca picuri de argint
Si seninul cer albastru mândru lacrimile-l prind ;
Dar dacă ar cădea toate, el rămâne trist si gol,
N-ai putea să faci cu ochii înăltimilor ocol --
Noaptea stelelor, a lunei, a oglinzilor de râu
Nu-i ca noaptea cea mocnită si pustie din sicriu ;
Si din când în când vărsate, mândru lacrimile-ti sed,
Dar de seci întrag izvorul, atunci cum o să te văd ?
Prin ei curge rumenirea, mândră, ca de trandafiri,
Si zăpada viorie din obrajii tăi subtiri --
Apoi noaptea lor albastră, a lor dulce vecinicie,
Ce usor se mistuieste prin plânsorile pustie...
Cine e nerod să ardă în cărbuni smaraldul rar
S-a lui vecinică lucire s-o strivească în zadar ?
Tu-ti arzi ochi si frumseta... Dulce noaptea lor se stânge,
Si nici stii ce pierde lumea. Nu mai plânge, nu mai plânge !

VI

O, tu crai cu barba-n noduri ca si câltii când nu-i perii,
Tu în cap nu ai grăunte, numai pleavă si puzderii.
Bine-ti pare să fii singur, crai bătrân fără de minti, 
Să oftezi dup-a ta fată, cu ciubucul între dinti ?
Să te primbli si să numeri scânduri albe în cerdac ?
Mult bogat ai fost odată, mult rămas-ai tu sărac !
Alungat-o ai pe dânsa ca departe de părinti
În coliba împistrită ea să nasc-un pui de print.
În zadar ca s-o mai cate tu trimiti în lume crainic,
Nimeni n-a afla locasul, unde ea s-ascunde tainic.

VII

Sură-i sara cea de toamnă ; de pe lacuri apa sură
Înfunda miscarea-i creată între stuf la iezătură ;
Iar pădurea lin suspină si prin frunzele uscate
Rânduri, rânduri trece-un fremăt, ce le scutură pe toate.
De când codrul, dragul codru, troienindu-si frunza toată,
Îsi deschide-a lui adâncuri, fata lunei să le bată, 
Tristă-i firea, iară vântul sperios vo creangă farmă --
Singuratece isvoare fac cu valurile larmă.
Pe potica dinspre codri, cine oare se coboară ?
Un voinic cu ochi de vultur lunga vale o măsoară.
Sapte ani de când plecat-ai, zburător cu plete negre,
S-ai uitat de soarta mândrei, iubitoarei tale fete !
Si pe câmpul gol el vede un copil umblând descult
Si cercând ca să adune într-un cârd bobocii multi.
- "Bună vreme, măi băiete !" -- "Multămim, voinic străin !"
- "Cum te cheamă, măi copile ?" -- "Ca pe tată-meu -- Călin
Mama-mi spune câteodată, de-o întreb: a cui-s, mamă ?
'Zburătoru-ti este tată si pe el Călin îl cheamă'."
Când l-aude, numai dânsul îsi stia inima lui,
Căci copilul cu bobocii era ciar copilul lui.
Atunci intră în colibă si pe capătu-unei laiti,
Lumina cu mucul negru într-un hârb un ros opait ;
Se coceau pe vatra sură souă turte în cenusă,
Un papuc e sub o grindă, iară altul după usă ;
Hârâită, noduroasă stă în colb râsnita veche,
În cotlon torcea motanul pieptănându-si o ureche ;
Sub icoana afumată unui sfânt cu comănac
Arde-n candel-o lumină cât un sâmbure de mac;
Pe-a icoanei policioară, busuioc si mint-uscată 
Împlu casa-ntunecoasă de-o mireasmă pipărată ;
Pe cuptiorul uns cu humă si pe coscovii păreti
Zugrăvit-au c-un cărbune copilasul cel istet
Purcelusi cu coada sfredel si cu bete-n loc de labă,
Cum mai bine i se sede unui purcelus de treabă.
O besică-n loc de sticlă e întinsă-n ferăstruie
Printre care trece-o dungă mohorâtă si gălbuie.
Pe un pat de scânduri goale doarme tânăra nevastă
În mocnitul întuneric si cu fata spre fereastă.
El s-asază lângă dânsa, fruntea ei o netezeste,
O desmiardă cu durere, suspinând o drăgosteste,
Pleacă gura-i la ureche, blând pe nume el o cheamă,
Ea ridică somnoroasă lunga genelor maramă,
Spăriet la el se uită... i se pare că visează, 
Ar zâmbi si nu se-ncrede, ar răcni si nu cutează.
El din patu-i o ridică si pe pieptul lui si-o pune,
Inima-i zvâcneste tare, viata-i parcă se răpune.
Ea se uită, se tot uită, un cuvânt măcar nu spune,
Râde doar cu ochii-n lacrimi, spăriată de-o minune,
S-apoi îi suceste părul pe-al ei deget alb, subtire,
Îsi ascunde fata rosă l-a lui piept duios de mire.
El stergarul i-l desprinde si-l împinge lin la vale,
Drept în crestet o sărută pe-al ei păr de aur moale
Si bărbia i-o ridică, s-uită-n ochii-i plini de apă,
Si pe rând s-astupă gura, când cu gura se adapă.

VIII

De treci codri de aramă, de departe vezi albind
S-auzi mândra glăsuite a pădurii de argint.
Acolo, lângă isvoară, iarba pare de omăt,
Flori albastre tremur ude în văzduhul tămâiet ;
Pare-că si trunchii vecinici poartă suflete sub coajă,
Ce suspină printre ramuri cu a glasului lor vrajă.
Iar prin mândrul întuneric al pădurii de argint
Vezi isvoare zdrumicate peste pietre licurind ;
Ele trec cu harnici unde si suspină-n flori molatic,
Când coboară-n ropot dulce din tăpsanul prăvălatic,
Ele sar în bulgări fluizi peste prundul din răstoace,
În cuibar rotind de ape, peste care luna zace.
Mii de fluturi mici albastri, mii de roiuri de albine
Curg în râuri sclipitoare peste flori de miere pline,
Împlu aerul văratic de mireasmă si răcoare
Apopoarelor de muste sărbători murmuitoare.
Lângă lacul care-n tremur somnoros si lin de bate,
Vezi o masă mare-ntinsă cu făclii prea luminate,
Căci din patru părti a lumii împărati si-mpărătese
Au venit ca să serbeze nunta ginfasei mirese ;
Feti-frumosi cu păr de aur, zmei cu solzii de otele,
Cititorii cei de zodii si săgalnicul Pepele.
Iată craiul, socru mare, rezemat în jilt cu spată,
El pe capu-i poartă mitră si-i cu barba pieptănată ;
Tapăn, drept, cu schiptru-n mână, sede-n perine de puf
Si cu crengi îl apăr pagii de muscute si zăduf...
Acum iată din codru si Călin mirele iese, 
Care tine-n a lui mână, mâna gingasei mirese.
Îi fosnea uscat pe frunze poala lung-a albei rochii,
Fata-i rosie ca mărul, de noroc i-s umezi ochii ;
La pământ mai că-i ajunge al ei păr de aur moale,
Care-i cade peste brate, peste umerele goale.
Astfel vine mlădioasă, trupul ei frumos îl poartă,
Flori albastre are-n păru-i si o stea în frunte poartă.
Socrul roagă-n capul mesei să poftească să se pună
Nunul mare, mândrul soare si pe nună, mândra lună.
Si s-asează toti la masă, cum li-s anii, cum li-i rangul,
Lin vioarele răsună, iară cobza tine hangul.
Dar ce zgomot se aude ? Bâzâit ca de albine?
Toti se uită cu mirare si nu stiu de unde vine,
Până văd păinjenisul între tufe ca un pod,
Peste care trece-n zgomot o multime de norod.
Trec furnici ducând în gură de făină marii saci,
Ca să coacă pentru nuntă si plăcinte si colaci;
Si albinele-aduc miere, aduc colb mărunt de aur, 
Ca cercei din el să facă cariul, care-i mester faur.
Iată vine nunta-ntreagă -- vornicel i-un greierel, 
Îi sar purici înainte cu potcoave de otel;
În vesmânt de catifele, un bondar rotund în pântec
Somnoros pe nas ca popii glasuieste-ncet un cântec ;
O cojită de alună trag locuste, podu-l scutur, 
Cu musteata răsucită sede-n ea un mire flutur;
Fluturi multi, de multe neamuri, vin în urma lui un lant, 
Toti cu inime usoare, toti săgalnici si berbanti.
Vin tântarii lăutarii, gândăceii, cărăbusii,
Iar mireasa viorică i-astepta-ndărătul usii.
Si pe masa-mpărătească sare-un greier, crainic sprinten,
Ridicat în două labe, s-a-nchinat bătând din pinten;
El tuseste, îsi încheie haina plină de sireturi:
- "Să iertati, boieri, ca nunta s-o pornim si noi alături".

1876, 1 noiembrie
Mihail Eminescu
contents | continue  sumar | continua 
©Copyright 2014 Gabriel Ditu